Tag Archives: Employee benefits an expenses

Autumn Statement 2014 and the OTS

Autumn Statement

It was gratifying to hear the Chancellor give credit to Michael Jack and John Whiting of the OTS in his Autumn Statement speech today.

More importantly, he said the Government accepted “almost all” of the recommendations in our October report on improving the Competitiveness of UK tax administration. After the speech, we received a letter from the Financial Secretary, David Gauke MP, setting out the Government’s detailed response to this and other recent OTS reviews. We will put the letter on our website shortly.

Of course, many of the ideas in that review would be major undertakings with wide ranging impacts on businesses, and should rightly be considered fully in the next Parliament. Examples are closer alignment of accounting profit with taxable profit, and removing the distinction between trading and investment income. In the shorter term, HMRC has accepted our proposals to conduct a post implementation review of RTI (Real Time Information) and to improve assistance to businesses with greater use of email and better telephone services with appropriately trained staff along with many other administrative changes.

It is good to see such a positive reaction to our review of employee benefits in kind and expenses with four major reforms announced:
– abolishing the £8,500 taxable benefits threshold
– introducing a statutory exemption for benefits under £50
– a system of voluntary payrolling of benefits
– replacing the expenses dispensation regime with an exemption for paid and reimbursed expenses.
We expect to see these featured in the 2015 Finance Bill. The Treasury will also soon launch a major review of tax rules for travel and subsistence expenses.

On the downside, the government has decided not to take forward two radical ideas from our review of employee share schemes – the proposals for a “marketable security” and a new employee shareholding vehicle. There simply wasn’t enough interest in the recent HMRC consultation on these ideas, which disappointed us. But overall there has been a good programme of reforms in the share schemes area, so we mustn’t gripe too much.

We are busy carrying out our review of the tax rules for employment status and expect to publish that report in February. We are also putting the finishing touches to a sweeping up report on taxation of business partnerships. And of course, we look forward to seeing the draft Finance Bill when it comes out shortly. One small job will be to update our tally of tax reliefs – currently at 1140, but we noticed a few new ones announced today…

Jeremy Sherwood
Head of OTS

Our new team

OTS standThe OTS team has seen a few changes over the past couple of months. Martin Gunson and Kelly Sizer have now completed their work on pensioner taxation, whilst Sarah Anderson and Tony Page have finished with employee share schemes. A big thank you to all four of them for their effort and dedication in producing their respective reviews.

In their place we have recruited a new team of Theresa Dendy, Tracey Bowler and Suzy Giele to work on our review of employee benefits and expenses. They will be joined by Michael Wilson later in the summer. 

Morwenna Scott has also joined the OTS to work on our tax definitions project. She will work Caroline Turnbull-Hall who returns as a formal secondee having previously worked on our tax reliefs review and the disincorporation relief project.

A new biographies section on our ‘About the OTS’ page has further details on all of our secondees.

Go anywhere and meet anyone…

Motorway lights

The title of this post has become the unofficial OTS motto. In the past we have been as far west as Toronto (see previous post) – Belfast in person – as far North as Aberdeen, South to Exeter, East to Norwich and most places in between. It is now that time of year again and we are looking forward to getting out and about to hear the views of businesses, individual taxpayers, advisers and HMRC alike.

Our review of employee benefits and expenses is now in full swing – we have a team of secondees in place and are starting to plan meetings with interested parties across the UK. This is (hopefully) where you come in.

If you have an interest in the review and would like to feed input into it please contact us at the following email: ots-employee.benefits@ots.gsi.gov.uk We welcome any comments you can make or we will be happy to travel to meet you – especially a local group of businesses or other interested parties –  or welcome you to our offices in central London.

Please note that we only have a small team and whilst we will try to get around as many groups as possible we can’t commit to meet everyone.

A secondee’s experience

IMG_0414 (427x640)The OTS is looking to recruit experienced tax professionals on short-term secondments for its review into employee benefits and expenses. Further details of the role can be found on the vacancies page of our website:

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/ots_vacancies.htm

If you would like to offer input to the employee benefits and expenses review, either in person or via email/telephone, please email the OTS at OTS-Employee.Benefits@ots.gsi.gov.uk

To give a flavour of what it is like to work for the OTS one of our secondees, Sarah Anderson, kindly blogged on her experiences. Over to Sarah:

In July 2011, I rather unthinkingly applied for a position as a secondee at the Office of Tax Simplification. I’d not heard of the OTS at that point but they were looking for people with experience with share plans, particularly with private companies, and it sounded interesting. In addition, the idea of simplifying even a tiny part of the tax code sounded like an excellent idea!

Eighteen months on and I can honestly say that the unthinking application was one of the best things I’ve ever done. For starters, there’s the undoubted kudos of swanning into the Treasury buildings like you belong there and the thrill of bumping into the big guns in the canteen. But even if you’re not as shallow as I am, the experience is one that I’d recommend wholeheartedly.

One of the most enjoyable parts of my 18 months’ secondment has undoubtedly been the opportunity to work alongside the leaders in my industry – particularly the chance to look at life from the perspective of HMRC and Treasury officials. I have always had respect for their experience and expertise; now I have had a greater insight into challenges they face on a daily basis that respect has increased enormously. I hope that one of the positive outcomes of the work of the OTS generally will be to increase trust and understanding between the private sector and HMRC – in the majority of cases, I really believe that our views and objectives are more closely aligned than perhaps we realise.

The experience has sometimes been challenging from a technical perspective. When the OTS produces a report, every single aspect of it is put under the spotlight by various parties: committee members with specialist tax knowledge, HMRC teams with (sadly, too much) experience of tax avoidance opportunities and the broader tax implications, Treasury officials looking at the hidden costs of proposed changes…and, of course, the civil servants always with an eye to the political angle. From the vague, “lightbulb” idea, right through to the precise wording (is it a “charge” or a “penalty”? Does the word “arrangement” have negative connotations?), every point is tested, questioned and argued with individuals who are absolutely the leaders in their field. Sometimes, you lose the arguments. That can, frankly, be terrifying – but like Nietzsche said (or Kelly Clarkson sang, take your pick), “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”!

The experience has been frustrating at times, downright infuriating at others, and sometimes the demands can really impinge on your day job. On a bad day, I think that we could, and should, have been braver, making more radical in our suggestions on employee share schemes. But I do believe we have made at least some improvements to the tax advantaged share schemes, and I hope our recommendations for unapproved plans will be accepted and remove some of the existing complexities for companies and HMRC alike. 

The reason I chose to work in this area is because I was given the chance to own shares in my employing company, and saw the difference it could make. So I am also really proud to have been involved an exercise that publicises the concept of employee share ownership. And – sad though it sounds – I am really excited when I see improvements to the share schemes legislation and I can say (to anyone who cares to listen): “I did that!”

Sarah Anderson
OTS Secondee on employee share schemes